British Airways flights powered by sustainable jet fuel created from used oil and food waste set to take off next year










British Airways plans to launch the first commercial flights powered by sustainable jet fuel next year as part of a green revolution in air travel.

Green jet fuel produced in the United States could be blended with conventional fossil fuel to power BA’s fleet.

The airline is also working with fuel companies on four projects to produce green jet fuel in the UK, which could power its planes from 2025.

The aviation industry is committed to achieving zero net carbon emissions by 2050, and BA wants the government’s target of aircraft using ten percent sustainable aviation fuel by 2030 to become a legally binding requirement.

British Airways plans to launch the first commercial flights powered by sustainable jet fuel next year as part of a green revolution in air travel

New jet engines can use up to 50% green jet fuel, but Rolls-Royce has said its Trent engines could be powered 100% by sustainable fuel by 2023.

The will to reduce airline emissions will be considerably reinforced at the COP26 climate summit on Wednesday, when a new coalition of governments will make an “ambitious and comprehensive declaration”.

It comes as the government’s Jet Zero Council, led by Secretary of Business Kwasi Kwarteng and Secretary of Transportation Grant Shapps, finalizes plans to boost sustainable jet fuel manufacturing.

Sustainable aviation fuel, which reduces CO2 emissions by up to 80%, can be made from used oils and fats, green and municipal waste, and non-food crops. It can also be produced synthetically in a process that captures carbon from the air.

Airline industry body IATA estimates that it could provide 65% of the emissions reduction needed by the sector to reach net zero by 2050. Green jet fuel is up to five times more expensive than conventional jet fuel and represents 1% of aviation fuel. used globally.

It comes as the government's Jet Zero Council, led by Secretary of Business Kwasi Kwarteng and Secretary of Transportation Grant Shapps, finalizes plans to boost sustainable jet fuel manufacturing.

It comes as the government’s Jet Zero Council, led by Secretary of Business Kwasi Kwarteng and Secretary of Transportation Grant Shapps, finalizes plans to boost sustainable jet fuel manufacturing.

The cost could mean higher airfares unless the government offers financial support, such as grants similar to those used to revive the offshore wind sector, a loan guarantee scheme to secure loans used to finance the production of green jet fuel, using the right air passenger revenues or an emissions trading system.

The government’s involvement could unleash the city’s investor support to meet the goal of building 13 sustainable aviation fuel plants by 2030, each costing £ 300million.

BA is investing in a plant in Immingham, Lincolnshire, which could produce 80 million liters per year within four years.

Another biorefinery under development at Stanlow, Cheshire aims to produce 100 million liters per year – enough to run 1,200 Boeing 777-300 long-haul aircraft when blended 50-50 with traditional fuel.

The government says the sustainable aviation fuel sector could create 6,500 jobs by the mid-1930s and boost the economy by £ 900million.

Meanwhile, 100,000 protesters took to the streets of Glasgow yesterday in the biggest protest to date at COP26.

Organized to coincide with 300 similar events around the world, the Global Day of Action for Climate Justice involved environmental groups, charities, climate activists, unions and indigenous peoples.


Source link

About The Author

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.